Published On: Wed, Apr 3rd, 2024
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UK’s prettiest beach has a unique feature and is near a beautiful town | Travel News | Travel


Tourists looking for the best location for a short staycation on the coast have been advised to visit Kynance Cove in Cornwall.

Situated at the tip of Lizard Peninsula, near Mount’s Bay, a recent study conducted by photo wall art creator StoryBoards found that the small cove is regarded as the prettiest beach in the UK, with 66,000 Instagram users posting photos of it.

One of the most distinctive elements of Kynance Cove is its serpentine rock formations, which form jagged towers throughout the area.

Whilst similar formations can be found on many other beaches around the world, the serpentine material is unique to Southern Cornwall and features a distinctive red or dark green colour.

Each formation on the cove has been given its own name and identity by locals, including ‘The Bishop’, due to its pointed tip resembling a hat, and ‘Asparagus Island’, a large mound covered in grass.

Kynance Cove offers a fascinating history which manages to live on, giving tourists the feeling that they have stepped back in time.

In 1846, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert visited the beach as part of their Cornish holiday, encouraging those from all over the country to consider it as a getaway destination.

Today’s tourists can still appreciate a vintage feel by stepping into the Kynance Cove Cafe, which has been a part of the beach since 1927.

Operated by the National Trust, parking facilities at Kynance Cove are good, but tourists are advised to arrive early to get a space during the summer break when the destination is at its busiest.

The car park is around a 10-minute walk from the beach and features steps. There are also bathroom facilities on the cove itself.

Visitors to the cove have also been warned that between July 1 and August 31, dogs are banned from entering the beach.

Tourists who are looking for more to do during their beach break can also visit the pretty town of Helston, located about half an hour away.

With a history spanning back to the 13th century, Helston features the ruins of a quaint castle, with the remains now featuring as part of a bowling green.

Visitors to the town can also take a trip to the Cornish Seal Sanctuary, which rehabilitates more than 70 pups every season, and The Museum of Cornish Life, which focuses on the area’s unique culture.



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