Published On: Wed, Feb 7th, 2024
Technology | 2,749 views

Your Sky TV bill is about to rocket – how much more you have to pay


If you use Sky TV or Sky broadband then there’s bad news coming for your monthly bill. The popular UK supplier has just confirmed its yearly price hikes with things going up by an average of 6.7 percent. That means those who currently pay £60 per month could find things increase to £64 from April 1. Pay £100 for your TV and internet access and your bill could hit over £106 come the spring.

Sky says that it’s having to put up prices due to improvements it’s made with its products and the added financial pressures all firms are currently facing.

Confirming the news, Sky said: “Our Sky broadband and TV products will see an average increase of 6.7% from April. We don’t take these decisions lightly – the change in price reflects the ongoing cost pressures we face, and our continued investment to bring the best experience for our customers.”

Although 6.7 percent is another hefty hike, it’s not as bad as some other suppliers. BT has already confirmed its costs are going up by 7.9 percent in the spring and other providers, such as EE and Vodafone, have announced similar increases. Virgin Media is expected to reveal its rises in the coming weeks.

If you’re not happy about paying more then now is a good time to get on the phone and negotiate a better deal. Sky is hiking things by a percentage of your current price so the less you pay before April 1 the lower the bill hike will be.

It’s unlikely Sky will want you moving to a rival supplier so you might find there’s a decent discount to be bagged. Just remember to go into call having checked out what Sky’s rivals are offering. Also, be polite as getting angry probably won’t help you get the very best price.

Sky has confirmed that all customers who are impacted will be contacted from the end of this month to let them know how the changes impact their package – customers will start to see the relevant prices change on their bill from April.



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